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Web SIGMAA Reception and Guest Lecture

Friday, July 28, 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m., Salon A-4

5:30 – 5:45 Light Refreshments

5:45 – 6:35 Guest Lecture

Daniel Kaplan, Macalester College

MOSAIC, statPREP, and the Web
Project MOSAIC is engaged in helping instructors unify mathematical modeling, statistics, and computing to implement the many recommendations of the MAA CRAFTY reports. StatPREP is an extension of MOSAIC, aimed to help statistics instructors embrace contemporary data science. I’ll describe briefly the origins of the projects, show a few examples of modeling-based calculus, data-centric statistics, and the ways the mosaic package for R streamlines the interface between students and computation. I’ll also show the newest platforms for providing instruction and computation on the web: DataCamp.com and the learnr system from RStudio. Our goal is to give instructors and their students access to sophisticated and relevant computing and high-quality course materials with a browser.

Contributed Paper Session

Online Assessment: Where We Have Been, Where We Are and Where We Are Going

Saturday, July 29, 1:00 p.m. – 3:35 p.m., Salon C-6

Online assessment is now a common part of the academic experience for faculty and students. The technology has been around long enough to evolve substantially from early implementations. The purpose of this session is to allow faculty to share what is new, what they are hoping for in the future, and what have we learned from present and past implementations of the systems. We also invite contributions regarding pedagogical issues surrounding the use of these resources.

We are seeking expository talks on what resources are available, demonstrations, and innovative ideas as well as scholarly talks about the effectiveness of online assessment resources. Talks on online homework, placement testing, just in time resources, and other forms of online assessment are welcome.

Organizers:
Barbara Margolius, Cleveland State University
John Travis, Mississippi College

Sponsored by Web SIGMAA

 

  • Web SIGMAA Reception and Guest Lecture, Friday, 5:30–6:50 pm
  • Poster Session: Me and My Gadgets–Teaching with Technology

    • Saturday, 8:00 AM–12:00 PM
    • International 2, International Level, Marriott Marquis
  • MAA Session on The Advancement of Open Educational Resources, I and II
    • Saturday, 8:00 – 10:15 AM (Session I) and 1:00-3:55 PM (Session II)
    • A702, Atrium Level, Marriott Marquis

WebSIGMAA Reception and Lecture

Friday January 8, 2016, 5:30 p.m.-7:00 p.m.

Room 2A, Washington State Convention Center

5:30 – 6:00 WEB SIGMAA Business Meeting and Reception

6:00 – 7:00 WEB SIGMAA Guest Lecture Streamlining assessment, feedback, and archival with auto-multiple-choice.
Matthew Leingang*, New York University

Minicourses

Minicourse #2. Visual Topics in Undergraduate Complex Analysis, presented by Michael Brilleslyper, US Air Force Academy, and Michael Dorff, Brigham Young University; Part A, Wednesday, 4:45 pm–6:45 pm, and Part B, Friday, 3:30 pm–5:30 pm.

Complex analysis is a staple of the undergraduate mathematics curriculum. It is a beautiful mathematical subject that unifies and extends many topics from other courses. The course readily pulls together the theories of polynomial equations, differentiation, integration, and series, while also including geometry and function theory. Unfortunately, many undergraduate courses end right where the cool stuff starts. In this minicourse, the proposers intend to expose the participants to two of the myriad of topics that are possible: (1) an introduction to minimal surfaces, and (2) the dynamics and locations of zeros of families of polynomials. Both of these topics are accessible to an audience having familiarity with the basics of complex analysis. The course is aimed at instructors of complex variables who are looking for some interesting topics for their courses, mathematicians who want to start learning something about the proposed areas, and instructors looking for potential undergraduate research projects to do with their students. Participants will need to bring their own computers with a current version of Mathematica, Maple™, or MATLAB. There will be limited support for Sage.

Minicourse #16. Mobile Mathematics—Interactive Apps for Teaching and Learning, presented by Lila Roberts, Clayton State University, and Andrew G. Bennett, Kansas State University; Part A, Wednesday, 4:45 pm– 6:45 pm, and Part B, Friday, 3:30 pm–5:30 pm.

Mobile devices have made their way into our lives and our classrooms. In this minicourse, participants will learn about various ways to integrate tablets and other mobile devices into mathematics courses. The presenters will demonstrate interactive resources that they have developed as well as other applications/materials that are ready-made and easily available. In addition, participants will learn how to use various ways to develop new and/or adapt existing resources for their face-to-face and online classrooms. Bring your own mobile device and/or a wireless capable laptop computer. – See more at: http://jointmathematicsmeetings.org/meetings/national/jmm2016/2181_minicourses#sthash.nhFLHXL6.dpuf

Paper Sessions

Wednesday January 6, 2016, 8:00 a.m.-10:50 a.m.

AMS Special Session on Mathematical Information in the Digital Age of Science, I
Room 603, Washington State Convention Center

Thursday January 7, 2016, 8:00 a.m.-11:50 a.m.

AMS Special Session on Mathematical Information in the Digital Age of Science, III
Room 603, Washington State Convention Center

Thursday January 7, 2016, 1:00 p.m.-3:25 p.m.

MAA General Contributed Paper Session on Mathematics and Technology
Yakima 2, Yakima Level One, Washington State Conference Center

Friday January 8, 2016, 8:00 a.m.-10:55 a.m.

MAA Session on the Development and Adoption of Open Educational Resources for Teaching and Learning, I
Room 620, Washington State Convention Center

Friday January 8, 2016, 1:00 p.m.-3:55 p.m.

MAA Session on the Development and Adoption of Open Educational Resources for Teaching and Learning, II
Room 620, Washington State Convention Center
Organizers:
Benjamin Atchison, Framingham State University batchison@framingham.edu
Jeremy Russell, The College of New Jersey

Poster Sessions

Thursday January 7, 2016, 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.
MAA Poster Session on Projects Supported by the NSF Division of Undergraduate Education
Hall 4F, 4th Floor, Washington State Convention Center

Saturday January 9, 2016, 10:00 a.m.-11:55 a.m.
MAA Poster Session
Me and My Gadgets—Teaching with Technology.
Skybridge, 4th Floor, Washington State Convention Center
Organizers:
Tom Hagedorn, The College of New Jersey
Karl Schmitt, Valparaiso University
Michael Scott, California State University, Monterey Bay
John Travis, Mississippi College

Reception/Discussion

Business Meeting

Friday, August 8, 5:30 p.m. – 5:50 p.m. Hilton Portland, Ballroom Level, Parlor AB

Discussion

What Are Effective Online Homework Problems in Mathematics?

Friday, August 8, 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Hilton Portland, Ballroom Level, Parlor AB


Below are some of the highlights from the scientific program. Full information is available at http://www.maa.org/meetings/mathfest.

WebSIGMAA-sponsored panel

Open Source Resources for Mathematics: Benefits and Costs

Friday August 8, 1:00 p.m. – 2:20 p.m. Hilton Portland, 23rd Floor, Skyline 2

This panel will include innovators in the development and use  of open source resources for mathematics. A variety of options will be represented ranging from computer software to online homework and Open Textbooks. Significant time will be reserved for questions from the audience and between the panelists.

Each of the panelists will focus on the use of open source systems and how each can successfully enable end users to do and teach mathematics. Costs – both tangible and intangible – will be considered and compared to those normally associated with commercial products. Each panelist will address the advantages and disadvantages of these systems when compared to commercial products – and include any research on the efficacy of using their system for teaching purposes. Philosophical reasons for supporting open source products will be addressed. Additionally, avenues regarding how the audience can get involved in contributing to product development will be provided.

Panelists:

  • Davide Cervone, Union University (MathJax)
  • Jane Long, Stephen F. Austin State University (Sage)
  • Albert Kim, Reed College (R)
  • Rob Beezer, University of Puget Sound (Open Textbooks)
  • Robin Cruz, College of Idaho (WeBWorK)

Organizers:

  • John Travis, Mississippi College
  • Karl-Dieter Crisman, Gordon College

Minicourses

3. Enhancing Conceptual Understanding of Multivariable Calculus Using CalcPlot3D for Visualization and Exploration

Paul Seeburger, Monroe Community College

Part A: Thursday, August 7, 3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m., Hilton Portland Executive Tower, Salon Ballroom I
Part B: Saturday, August 9, 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m., Hilton Portland Executive Tower, Salon Ballroom I

It is difficult for students to develop an accurate and intuitive understanding of the geometric relationships of calculus from static diagrams alone. This is especially true for the 3D concepts of multivariable calculus. In this course, we will explore ways to help students make these connections by visualizing multivariable calculus using CalcPlot3D, a versatile applet developed with NSF funding (NSF-DUE-0736968). Participants will learn how to customize this applet to create demonstrations and guided exploration activities for student use. Images created in this applet can be pasted into participants’ documents. See http://web.monroecc.edu/calcNSF/. Basic HTML experience is helpful. Bring a Java-enabled laptop.

5. Teaching Linear Algebra with GeoGebra: Making Connections between Algebra and Geometry

James D. FactorAlverno College
Susan F. Pustejovsky, Alverno College

Part A: Thursday, August 7, 3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m., Hilton Portland Executive Tower, Salon Ballroom III
Part B: Saturday, August 9, 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m., Hilton Portland Executive Tower, Salon Ballroom III

Participants will work with GeoGebra applets supporting instruction in elementary Linear Algebra. The workshop will consist of a) an overview of the topics and design, incorporating activities fostering connections between algebra and geometry; b) participant work with selected applets, including a very short introduction to GeoGebra; c) discussion of possible pedagogical approaches incorporating the applets; d) a look at some related application problems; e) summary of preliminary evaluation results; f) wrap-up, including remarks and suggestions by participants. Links to further freely available resources will be provided.

6. SIMIODE – Teaching Differential Equations through Modeling and Technology

Brian Winkel, United States Military Academy

Part A: Thursday, August 7, 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m., Hilton Portland Executive Tower, Salon Ballroom III
Part B: Friday, August 8, 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m., Hilton Portland Executive Tower, Salon Ballroom III

This minicourse will permit participants to experience SIMIODE – Systemic Initiative for Modeling Investigations and Opportunities with Differential Equations, an online community of teachers and learners of differential equations who use modeling and technology throughout the learning process. Participants will share several learning opportunities using SIMIODE materials; develop models from the student perspective; engage in collegial activities about uses of SIMIODE modeling scenarios; and initiate the creation of their own teaching scenario contributions to SIMIODE through partnering with other participants in and after the minicourse. The web home for SIMIODE is at www.simiode.org.


Other Panels

Integrating Mathematical Software into Lower-Division Mathematics Courses

Friday, August 8, 4:10 p.m. – 5:30 p.m., Hilton Portland, 23rd Floor, Skyline 2

This panel session will discuss the use of mathematical software as a teaching tool in math courses and techniques for successful adoption.  In this panel, we will specifically focus on using mathematical software in calculus and calculus-related lower-division courses.   With the growing integration of technology into peoples’ working lives, teaching students to use technology to do mathematics can be instrumental in allowing mathematics to become a tool students can apply throughout their lives. It also provides an additional avenue for students to enhance their understanding of the concepts underlying the calculations, by providing visualizations, or by allowing them to work with large, real-world data sets. The speakers will be content creators and teaching practitioners who will address not only the capabilities of the technology, but also proven best practices for using this technology in post-secondary education. This panel has been organized by the MAA Committee on Technology in Mathematics Education.

Panelists:
Tom Dick, Oregon State University
Bill Bauldry, Appalachian State University
Doug Ensley, Shippensburg University

Organizers:
Natalie Linnell, Santa Clara University
Wade Ellis, Texas Instruments

Sponsor: Committee on Technology in Mathematics Education


Contributed Paper Sessions

Mathematics and Technology

Friday, August 8, 8:30 a.m. – 11:40 a.m., Hilton Portland, Ballroom Level, Galleria III

Inspiring Critical Thinking Through Programming Projects in a Precalculus Class

8:30 a.m. – 8:40 a.m.
Andrea Blum, SUNY Suffolk County Community College
Alexander Atwood, SUNY Suffolk County Community College

Using an Online Homework System for Written Homework

8:45 a.m. – 8:55 a.m.
Matthew Leingang, New York University

Flipped Classrooms Require – and Should Inspire – Better Software

9:00 a.m. – 9:10 a.m.
John C. Miller, The City College of C.U.N.Y. (emeritus)

Evolution of a Statistics Classroom

9:15 a.m. – 9:25 a.m.
Steven Klassen, Missouri Western State University

Using Online Technologies to Create Journal Articles in Numerical Analysis

9:30 a.m. – 9:40 a.m.
Mili Shah, Loyola

Euclid 21: Euclid’s Elements for the 21st Century

9:45 a.m. – 9:55 a.m.
Eugene Boman, Penn State, Harrisburg Campus

The Sophisticated Pencil: Computation as Transformation of the Traditional Mathematics Curriculum

10:00 a.m. – 10:10 a.m.
Jeff Randell Knisley, East Tennessee State University

An Active Introduction to Sage

10:15 a.m. – 10:25 a.m.
Brian Katz, Augustana College

Advances in Lurch, A Word Processor that Can Check Students’ Proofs

10:30 a.m. – 10:40 a.m.
Nathan C Carter, Bentley University
Kenneth G Monks, University of Scranton

Dynamic Visualization’s Effect on Mathematics Graduate Student and Inservice Teachers’ Views of Transformations of Functions

10:45 a.m. – 10:55 a.m.
James Anthony Mendoza Epperson, The University of Texas at Arlington
Andrew Paul Byrns, Dallas Independent School District

Experience-Driven Evolution of Technology-Based Courses

11:00 a.m. – 11:10 a.m.
Rebekah Gilbert, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Staying In Touch with Students with Technology

11:15 a.m. – 11:25 a.m.
Ginger Harper, Kaplan University

Exploring the Use of Mobile Devices as Student Response Systems in Undergraduate Mathematics Courses

11:30 a.m. – 11:40 a.m.
Jana Talley, Jackson State University
Lecretia Buckley, Jackson State University
Jessica Buck Murphy, Jackson State University
Shontrice Garrett, Jackson State University

Flipping Pedagogy in College Mathematics Courses, Part I

Thursday, August 7, 1:00 p.m. – 5:35 p.m., Hilton Portland, Plaza Level, Broadway III & IV

While the expression “flipping a course” is relatively new, this pedagogical strategy has been around for a number of years. Some tenets that underlie this type of pedagogy are that: (1) out-of-class time should be highly structured to best prepare students for in-class activities; (2) it is useful to evaluate students’ pre-class preparation and for instructors to have access to this information; (3) class time is better spent having students engage in cooperative problem solving and discussions rather than listening and taking notes; and, (4) students benefit from more frequent structured practice and feedback in the classroom from a knowledgeable teacher. In this session participants will present and discuss examples of flipped mathematics courses and share the benefits and challenges of this type of pedagogy. Descriptions of unique models of flipped classes are welcome as are results of research on flipping pedagogy.

Jean McGivney-BurelleUniversity of Hartford
Larissa SchroederUniversity of Hartford
John WilliamsUniversity of Hartford
Fei XueUniversity of Hartford
Mako HarutaUniversity of Hartford
Ben PollinaUniversity of Hartford

Flipped/Inquiry-Based Learning Approach in a ‘Large’ College Algebra Classroom: An Interim Report

1:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Perry Y.C. Lee, Kutztown University of Pennsylvania
Padraig McLoughlin, Kutztown University of Pennsylvania

Flipping College Algebra: A Blended Approach

1:20 p.m. – 1:35 p.m.
Alison Reddy, University of Illinois

Procedural and Conceptual Thinking in a Flipped College Algebra Classroom

1:40 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
Emilie Naccarato, University of Northern Colorado
Michael Spannuth, University of Northern Colorado
Bill Blubaugh, University of Northern Colorado
Gulden Karakok, University of Northern Colorado

Re “modeling” College Algebra:  A Flipped, Inquiry-Based Approach

2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Kathy Pinzon, Georgia Gwinnett College
Daniel Pinzon, Georgia Gwinnett College
Matt Stackpole, Georgia Gwinnett College

TEAL (Technology Enhanced Active Learning) College Algebra at Montana State University

2:20 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.
Heidi Staebler-Wiseman, Montana State University
Jocelyn Short, Montana State University
Kelsey Koch, Montana State University

Integrating Sustainability into Algebra Courses: A Flipped Classroom Model

2:40 p.m. – 2:55 p.m.
Rikki Wagstrom, Metropolitan State University

Flipping Freshman Mathematics

3:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Karen O’Hara, High Point University
Adam Graham-Squire, High Point University
Laurie Zack, High Point University
Jenny Fuselier, High Point University
Ron Lamb, High Point University

How Does Flipping Affect Students’ Perceptions about Learning Calculus?

3:20 p.m. – 3:35 p.m.
Larissa Bucchi Schroeder, University of Hartford
Jean Marie McGivney-Burelle, University of Hartford
Fei Xue, University of Hartford

Flip the Calculus Classroom: What Works, For Whom and in What Context?

3:40 p.m. – 3:55 p.m.
Veselin Jungic, Simon Fraser University
Cindy Xin, Simon Fraser University
Jamie Mulholland, Simon Fraser University
Harpreet Kaur, Simon Fraser University
Sonja Surjanovic, Simon Fraser University

A Study of Flipping vs Not Flipping in Applied Calculus

4:00 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
Lori Beth Ziegelmeier, Macalester College
Chad Topaz, Macalester College

Challenges and Pitfalls of Assessing the Effectiveness of Flipped Mathematics Courses

4:20 p.m. – 4:35 p.m.
Jean Marie McGivney-Burelle, University of Hartford
Larissa Bucchi Schroeder, University of Hartford

Meta-analysis of Flipped “Pedagogy” in Undergraduate Mathematics Courses

4:40 p.m. – 4:55 p.m.
Gulden Karakok, University of Northern Colorado
Emilie Naccarato, University of Northern Colorado

Flipping Calculus II: Did it Improve this Infamous Course?

5:00 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.
Mindy Capaldi, Valparaiso University

Flipping the Integral Calculus Classroom with Multiple Instructors

5:20 p.m. – 5:35 p.m.
Jim Rolf, Yale University
Yu-Wen Hsu, Yale University
Susie Kimport, Yale University
Jennifer Frederick, Yale University

Flipping Pedagogy in College Mathematics Courses, Part II

Friday, August 8, 8:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m., Hilton Portland, Ballroom Level, Parlor AB

Reading Guides in a Flipped Classroom

8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.
Mary D Shepherd, Northwest Missouri State University

A Measured Approach to Flipping the Analysis Classroom

8:50 a.m. – 9:05 a.m.
Christine Ann Shannon, Centre College

A Day in the Life of an Inverted Classroom

9:10 a.m. – 9:25 a.m.
Reza O Abbasian, Texas Lutheran University
John T Sieben, Texas Lutheran University

Flipping the Classroom in Introductory Statistics

9:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.
Emily Cilli-Turner, Salve Regina University

Introductory Statistics in a Flipped Format for Community College Students

9:50 a.m. – 10:05 a.m.
Jessica Knoch, Lane Community College

Math Bio or BioMath? Flipping a Mathematical Biology Course

10:10 a.m. – 10:25 a.m.
Eric Eager, University of Wisconsin – La Crosse

An Activity-Based Approach to Flipping Quantitative Literacy

10:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.
Rebecca Diischer, South Dakota State University

Flipping the Discrete Math Classroom

10:50 a.m. – 11:05 a.m.
Benjamin V.C. Collins, University of Wisconsin-Platteville
James A. Swenson, University of Wisconsin-Platteville

Technology Tips for Creating Videos in a Flipped Mathematics Course

11:10 a.m. – 11:25 a.m.
Fei Xue, University of Hartford
Larissa Bucchi Schroeder, University of Hartford

Selling the Concept – a Primer on Salesmanship of the Flipped Classroom Model

11:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.
Alex Capaldi, Valparaiso University

Sponsored by WebSIGMAA

Friday January 17, 2014 5:00 PM-6:20 PM
SIGMAA on Mathematics Instruction Using the Web Business Meeting, Reception, and Guest Lecture
Room 350, BCC

    • 5:00 PM-5:30 PM
      Business Meeting and Reception; talk to immediately follow at 5:30 p.m.
    • 5:30 PM-6:20 PM
      Mobile math apps.
      Doug Ensley, Shippensburg University

Saturday January 18, 2014 8:30 AM-9:50 AM
MAA Committee on Technologies in Mathematics Education-MAA Committee on the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics-WEBSIGMAA Panel Discussion
Room 307, BCC

  • 8:30 AM-9:50 AM
    Two worlds collide: MOOCs and the ivory tower.
    Organizers:
    John Travis, Misissippi College
    Martha Siegel, Towson University
    Panelists:
    Keith Devlin, Stanford University
    Robert Ghrist, University of Pennsylvania
    Michael Starbird, University of Texas at Austin
    Marilyn Carlson, Arizona State University

Other events of potential interest

Wednesday January 15, 2014 8:00 AM-10:55 AM
MAA General Contributed Paper Session on Teaching Introductory Mathematics
Room 347, BCC
Organizers:
Jennifer Beineke, Western New England University, jbeineke@wne.edu
Bem Cayco, San Jose State University, bem.cayco@sjsu.edu
Kimberly Presser, Shippensburge University, kjpres@ship.edu

Wednesday January 15, 2014 2:15 PM-5:50 PM
MAA Session on Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Collegiate Mathematics, II
Room 339, BCC
Organizers:
Jackie Dewar, Loyola Marymount University, jdewar@lmu.edu
Tom Banchoff, Brown University
Curtis Bennett, Loyola Marymount University
Pam Crawford, Jacksonville University
Edwin Herman, University of Wisconsin Stevens Point

Wednesday January 15, 2014 2:15 PM-4:15 PM
MAA Minicourse \#9: Part A
Room 343, BCC

  • 2:15 PM-4:15 PM
    WeBWorK: An open-source alternative for generating and delivering online homework problems.
    Presenters:
    John Travis, Mississippi College
    Jason Aubrey, University of Missouri
    Paul Pearson, Hope College
  • Wednesday January 15, 2014 4:30 PM-6:00 PM
    AMS Committee on the Profession Panel Discussion
    Room 336, BCC

    • 4:30 PM-6:00 PM
      Online courses: Benefits and pitfalls.
      Organizers:
      Dan Abramovich, Brown University
      Patricia Hersh, North Carolina State University
      Moderators:
      Abigail Thompson, University of California Davis
      Panelists:
      Tina Garrett, St Olaf College
      Robert Ghrist, University of Pennsylvania
      William (Brit) E. Kirwan, University System of Maryland
      Randy McCarthy, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign

Thursday January 16, 2014 1:00 PM-3:55 PM
AMS Session on Mathematics Education
Room 311, BCC

Friday January 17, 2014 8:00 AM-10:55 AM
MAA Session on Using Online Resources to Augment the Traditional Classroom, I
Room 350, BCC
Organizers:
Mike May, Saint Louis University, maymk@slu.edu
Paul Seeburger, Monroe Community College

Friday January 17, 2014 1:00 PM-5:55 PM
MAA Session on Flipping the Classroom, II
Room 337, BCC
Organizers:
Krista Maxson, Shawnee State University, kmaxson@shawnee.edu
Zsuzsanna Szaniszlo, Valparaiso University

Friday January 17, 2014 1:00 PM-3:00 PM
MAA Minicourse \#9: Part B
Room 343, BCC

  • 1:00 PM-3:00 PM
    WeBWorK: An open-source alternative for generating and delivering online homework problems.
    Presenters:
    John Travis, Mississippi College
    Jason Aubrey, University of Missouri
    Paul Pearson, Hope College

Friday January 17, 2014 1:00 PM-4:30 PM
MAA Session on Using Online Resources to Augment the Traditional Classroom, II
Room 350, BCC
Organizers:
Mike May, Saint Louis University, maymk@slu.edu
Paul Seeburger, Monroe Community College

Saturday January 18, 2014 8:00 AM-10:55 AM
MAA Session on Teaching with Technology: Impact, Evaluation, and Reflection, I
Room 341, BCC
Organizers:
Peter Gavin LaRose, University of Michigan, glarose@umich.edu

Saturday January 18, 2014 1:00 PM-5:35 PM 

MAA Session on Teaching with Technology: Impact, Evaluation, and Reflection, II
Room 341, BCC
Organizers:
Peter Gavin LaRose, University of Michigan, glarose@umich.edu

Saturday January 18, 2014 2:30 PM-4:40 PM
MAA General Contributed Paper Session on Mathematics and Technology
Room 346, BCC
Organizers:
Jennifer Beineke, Western New England University, jbeineke@wne.edu
Bem Cayco, San Jose State University, bem.cayco@sjsu.edu
Kimberly Presser, Shippensburge University, kjpres@ship.edu

Reception/Discussion

WebSIGMAA members attending the Hartford MathFest will find many interesting talks and events. Most notable will be the WebSIGMAA Reception and Discussion from 5:00 to 6:30pm on Friday, August 2 in Room 17 of the Connecticut Convention Center. Be sure to stop by for some refreshments followed by an open discussion of a few topics of interest to our membership:

  • How do you augment the traditional classroom with online resources?
  • What are the emerging technologies for teaching mathematics? What will we see in the next 2-10 years?
  • What are the emerging pedagogies related to learning mathematics online?

Below are some of the highlights from the scientific program. Full information is available at http://www.maa.org.

Minicourse

2. Teaching with Classroom Voting and Clickers

Part 1, Thursday, August 1, 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 24
Part 2, Friday, August 2, 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 24

This minicourse will provide participants with an overview of classroom voting pedagogy in a wide range of college mathematics courses. Time will be spent discussing the logistics of classroom voting using clickers as well as recent research on this type of pedagogy. Participants will play the role of students in a voting demonstration, explore an online library of over 2300 classroom voting questions, prepare a lecture with voting questions for use in one of their own courses, and try their hands at writing some questions.

Holly Zullo, Carroll College
Jean McGivney-Burelle, University of Hartford
Ann Stewart, Hood College
Christopher Storm, Adelphi University

Contributed Paper Sessions

Best Practices for Teaching Online Courses

Thursday, August 1, 1:00 p.m. – 4:55 p.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 14

Online education is becoming increasingly common, and many institutions desire to offer courses online. Some faculty members are tasked with developing and teaching online courses without adequate training for doing so effectively. This session seeks to share ideas to help instructors of online courses. The focus will be on teaching courses completely online, rather than using online tools to augment a face-to-face class. Possible topics include strategies for delivering content, engaging students, fostering discussion and collaboration, and assessment in an online environment. Presentations about particular technologies useful for online classes are also welcome.

Organizer:
Matthew Wright, Huntington University

Bridging the Digital Divide: Building a Sense of Community and Improving Student Engagement
1:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Amy Wheeler, Hondros College

Collaboration and Assessment Strategies for Teaching Online Undergraduate vs. Graduate Courses
1:20 p.m. – 1:35 p.m.
Magdalena Luca, MCPHS University

Fostering Online Discussion in Introductory Statistics
1:40 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
Jacci White, Saint Leo University
Scott White, St. Petersburg College

Teaching Online Courses to Overseas Students
2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Xinlong Weng, University of Bridgeport

Getting Started in MY Online Math Class
2:20 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.
Carol Hannahs, Kaplan University

Teaching Online and Face-to-Face Students in the Same Class
2:40 p.m. – 2:55 p.m.
Elizabeth Miller, The Ohio State University

Creating a Community Within an On-line Class
3:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Cornelius P Nelan, Quinnipiac University

Teaching an Activities Based Course Online
3:20 p.m. – 3:35 p.m.
Donna Flint, South Dakota State University
Becky Diischer, South Dakota State University

Raising Standards for Math Practice Software
3:40 p.m. – 3:55 p.m.
John C Miller, The City College of The City University of New York

Living it Up with Live Binders: Organizing Faculty Shared Web 2.0 Resources
4:00 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
Lea Rosenberry, Kaplan University
Leslie Johnson, Kaplan University
Michelle Lis, Kaplan University

Using Digital Game-Based Learning in Online Math Courses
4:20 p.m. – 4:35 p.m.
Tamara Eyster, Kaplan University
Lea Rosenberry, Kaplan University

Teaching Statistics Online Using Blackboard Collaborate
4:40 p.m. – 4:55 p.m. 
Eric Ruggieri, College of the Holy Cross

Teaching Calculus, Part 1

Friday, August 2, 8:30 a.m. – 10:25 a.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 15

Organizers:
Kristi Meyer, Wisconsin Lutheran College
Thomas Hagedorn, The College of New Jersey

Assessing Maplets for Calculus: Best Practices for Instructors and Software Developers
8:30 a.m. – 8:40 a.m.
Douglas B Meade, University of South Carolina
Philip B Yasskin, Texas A&M University
Raymond E Patenaude, University of South Carolina
Robert Petrulis, EPRE Consulting LLC

Maplets for Calculus Expands Offerings in Precalculus, Calculus and Differential Equations
8:45 a.m. – 8:55 a.m.
Philip B Yasskin, Texas A&M University
Douglas B Meade, University of South Carolina
Matthew James Barry, Texas A&M University

Using Programming to Understand Limits in a Calculus II Class
9:00 a.m. – 9:10 a.m.
Amanda Harsy Ramsay, IUPUI (Indianapolis University Purdue University Indianapolis)

Video Games and Calculus
9:15 a.m. – 9:25 a.m.
Derek Thompson, Trine University

iPads in the Classroom: A Departmental Project at the University of Hartford
9:30 a.m. – 9:40 a.m.
Mako Haruta, University of Hartford

Implementing the Flipped Classroom in a First-Year Pre-Calculus/Calculus Course
9:45 a.m. – 9:55 a.m.
Kristen Sellke, Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota
Janel Schultz, Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota

SONET-MATH: Using Social Networks to Learn Mathematics
10:00 a.m. – 10:10 a.m.
Lori Dunlop-Pyle, University of Central Florida
Ivan Garibay, University of Central Florida
Ozlem Garibay, University of Central Florida
Amanda Koontz Anthony, University of Central Florida

Technology Enhanced Large Calculus Lectures
10:15 a.m. – 10:25 a.m.
Elizabeth Miller, The Ohio State University

Mathematics and Technology/Research in Analysis

Saturday, August 3, 1:00 p.m. – 3:25 p.m., Connecticut Convention Center, Room 26

Organizers:
Kristi Meyer, Wisconsin Lutheran College
Thomas Hagedorn, The College of New Jersey

Are You Ready for R
1:00 p.m. – 1:10 p.m.
Joseph Manthey, University of Saint Joseph, West Hartford, CT

Applets Embedded in WeBWorK Homework Problems
1:15 p.m. – 1:25 p.m.
Barbara Margolius, Cleveland State University

Using Lurch in an Introduction to Proofs Course
1:30 p.m. – 1:40 p.m.
Nathan Carter, Bentley University
Kenneth G. Monks, University of Scranton

Technology in the Mathematics Classroom
1:45 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
Helmut Knaust, The University of Texas at El Paso

Creating and Analyzing Chaotic Attractors Using Mathematica
2:00 p.m. – 2:10 p.m.
Ulrich Hoensch, Rocky Mountain College

An Introduction to Formal Laurent Series
2:15 p.m. – 2:25 p.m.
Xiao-Xiong Gan, Morgan State University

Classifying Rational Points in Generalized Cantor Sets and Cantor Like Sets
2:30 p.m. – 2:40 p.m.
Douglas Daniel, Presbyterian College

Geometric Approach to the Computation of Certain Definite Integrals
2:45 p.m. – 2:55 p.m.
Sergei Artamoshin, CCSU

Traveling Wave Solutions of the Porous Medium Equation
3:00 p.m. – 3:10 p.m.
Joseph A. Iaia, University of North Texas

Geometry of Fractal Squares
3:15 p.m. – 3:25 p.m.
Kristine Roinestad, Georgetown College

There were many great presentations in this session organized by Doug Meade (University of South Carolina) and Phil Yasskin (Texas A&M University), and a complete list can be found here and linked from the meeting website. Below we share links provided by a few of the presenters to the slides they used in their talks.

  • MathJax from an Author’s Point of View. Davide P. Cervone, Union College
    Abstract. MathJax allows authors to include mathematics easily in their web pages using LATEX notation, MathML, or AsciiMath syntax, and generates high-quality output using either HTML-and-CSS, SVG, or MathML. For pages with static content, adding a single line to your HTML files is all that is needed to have MathJax process its mathematical content; dynamic pages require a bit more interaction with MathJax. This talk will present an overview of some of the techniques for using MathJax interactively within your pages that include dynamic content, and how to use its configuration options to customize MathJax to your needs.
    Link to slides: http://www.math.union.edu/locate/Cervone/talks/2013-01-12.jmm/
  • The Sage Cell Server: embedding live computations in web pages. Jason Grout, Ira Hanson, Alex Kramer, Steven Johnson, and Byron Varberg, Drake University.
    Abstract. Sage (http://sagemath.org) is a comprehensive free open-source mathematics software system. We will present our work on the Sage Cell Server (http://aleph.sagemath.org), which enables anyone to embed live Sage computations directly into any web page. These computations can easily include 2d and 3d plots, sliders, buttons, and other controls to interact with the computation. You can also use permalinks and QR codes to link to computations from paper textbooks and emails. We will present a number of places these embedded interactive computations are being used, including textbooks, personal webpages, wikis, and a new online database of short Sage examples at http://interact.sagemath.org. We will also show you how you can easily embed interactive computations in your web page with just a few lines of javascript and HTML.
    Link to slides: http://sage.math.washington.edu/home/jason/sagecellslides/
  • Mobile Math Apps: The Smartphone Paradigm. Barbara Kaskosz, University of Rhode Island, and Douglas E Ensley, Shippensburg University.
    Abstract. We will discuss the demographic trends in smartphone adoption and the implications for education. In addition, we will share recently developed precalculus materials and discuss content, user interface, and the design of assessment tools intended to measure the effectiveness of these materials. Finally, we will discuss the Adobe AIR development process and the ease of portability to other platforms such as Apple iOS.
    Link to slides: http://sigmaa.maa.org/web/jmm2013/MobileMathApps_Presentation.ppt
  • An Online Calculus Text for the iPad. David A. Smith and Lawrence C. Moore, Duke University
    Abstract. The online textbook, Calculus: Modeling and Application, 2nd edition, published by MAA, is being adapted for reading and interacting on the iPad. The major changes in this adaptation include replacing XHTML pages with HTML, recasting mathematical symbols in MathJax, and replacing use of commercial computer algebra systems with embedded ”interacts” that are processed by Sage. Features of the book will be demonstrated directly from an iPad.
    Link to slides: http://sigmaa.maa.org/web/jmm2013/SmithMooreBackground.ppt
  • Online Mathematics Pedagogy: MathLynx. John A. Velling, Brooklyn College, and Terrence Richard Blackman, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    Abstract. MathLynx is the first dynamically generated interactive pedagogy environment. It is purely web-based, relying on multiple open-source softwares: MathJax for presentation of LaTeX, jsxGraph for 2-d graphics, three.js for 3-d graphics, a customized MathDox formula editor for client mathematical entry, all communicating with a server-side Sage engine. With such an array of tools, we have created a cross-linked library of mathematical topics for gateway level courses, incorporating many of the features of other interactive texts, and extending well beyond them. Here we will present a tour of the library, including special features available for instructors and institutions. We will briefly discuss how it has been used and student reactions.
    Link to slides: http://sigmaa.maa.org/web/jmm2013/JMM2013_Velling.pdf

Here’s a list of sessions and events at the San Diego Joint Mathematics Meetings that may be of interest to WebSIGMAA members. If you have other suggestions to share, please leave a comment here or on our facebook page.

Wednesday January 9, 2013, 8:00 a.m.-10:40 a.m.
MAA General Contributed Paper Session: Mathematics and Technology, I
Room 5B, Upper Level, San Diego Convention Center
Organizers:
Stephen Davis, Davidson College stdavis@davidson.edu
Gizem Karaali, Pomona College
Douglas Norton, Villanova University
Moderators:
David Hecker, St. Joseph’s University

Wednesday January 9, 2013, 2:15 p.m.-3:35 p.m.
MAA-NSF Panel Discussion
Reporting progress: A minisymposium of projects from the NSF Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement/Transforming Undergraduate Education in STEM program.
Room 4, Upper Level, San Diego Convention Center
Panelists:
Richard Alo, NSF Division of Undergraduate Education
Ron Buckmire, NSF Division of Undergraduate Education
Lee Zia, NSF Division of Undergraduate Education

Thursday January 10, 2013, 1:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m. & Saturday January 12, 2013, 1:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m MAA Minicourse #15: Part A/B
WeBWorK: An open source alternative for generating and delivering online homework problems.
Room 29D, Mezzanine Level, San Diego Convention Center
Presenters:  John Travis, Mississippi College & Jason Aubrey, University of Missouri

Thursday January 10, 2013, 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.
MAA Poster Session of Projects Supported by the NSF Division of Undergraduate Education
Exhibit Hall B2, Ground Level, San Diego Convention Center
Organizers: Jon Scott, Montgomery College Jon.Scott@montgomerycollege.edu

Friday January 11, 2013, 1:00 p.m.-3:35 p.m.
MAA Session on Using Mobile Communication Devices for Mathematics Education
Room 1B, Upper Level, San Diego Convention Center
Organizers: Lawrence Moore, Duke University lang@math.duke.edu & Lila Roberts, Clayton State University

Friday January 11, 2013, 5:00 p.m.-6:30 p.m.
SIGMAA on Mathematics Instruction Using the Web Business Meeting, Reception, and Guest Lecture
Room 1B, Upper Level, San Diego Convention Center

Saturday January 12, 2013, 8:00 a.m.-10:55 a.m.
MAA Session on Assessing the Effectiveness of Online Homework
Room 5B, Upper Level, San Diego Convention Center
Organizers:
Jason Aubrey, University of Missouri aubreyja@missouri.edu
John Travis, Mississippi College
Joanne Peeples, El Paso Community College

Saturday January 12, 2013, 1:00 p.m.-5:50 p.m.
AMS Special Session on The Present and Future of Mathematics on the Web
Room 31A, Upper Level, San Diego Convention Center
Organizers:
Douglas Meade, University of South Carolina meade@mailbox.sc.edu
Philip Yasskin, Texas A&M University

This post is a reference for resources discussed at Web SIGMAA Business Meeting, Discussion and Reception during MathFest 2012 in Madison, WI.

Real Time Survey of Web SIGMAA Discussion (Web Version)

Or Respond with Text Message

Text Message to number 37607 (text for each response)
  • What are your strategies for integrating online resources into the classroom? 192873 “response”
  • What emerging technologies to you think we’ll be using in our teaching in the near future? 217297 “response”
  • What emerging pedagogies related to learning mathematics online will become more mainstream in the near future? 192876 “response”
  • What session topics would you like Web SIGMAA to develop in the future? 217236 “response”

Example: Text Message: “217236 I want more sessions on assessing effectiveness of online homework” is sent to 37607

Poll Everywhere: http://www.polleverywhere.com

 

Khan Academy: http://www.khanacademy.org/

Salman Khan TED Talk:

 

 

 

Expansion of Technology into New Arenas – Introduction to Proofs:

 

Social Multiscreen Experience:
  • Plans for the experience at the USA Network
  • Example: Netflix and Wii 

There were many technology-related talks and sessions at this year’s MathFest in Lexington, KY.  You can find the full descriptions and abstracts here.

There was a general contributed paper session that focused on Technology and Teaching.

In addition to the talks listed above, there were some other events related to the use of technology in the classroom.

  • Panel Session – Teaching Mathematics with the New Tablets: iPads, Slates, and Smartphones
    Organizer: Lila Roberts, Clayton State University
    Panelists: John Ehrke, Abilene Christian University; Doug Ensley, Shippensburg University; Barbara Kaskosz, University of Rhode Island; and Lila Roberts, Clayton State University
  • NAM David Blackwell Lecture: Using E-mentoring to Prepare the Next Generation of Mathematics Teachers
    Farrah Jackson Chandler, Elizabeth City State University
  • Web SIGMAA Guest Lecture: Touchable Math with HTML5
    Andrew Bennett, Kansas State University